Category name:Washington

Virginia removes 25 States from CCW Reciprocity including WA and FL (Note: UT is still valid)

Source: http://www.oag.state.va.us/index.php/media-center/news-releases/675-december-22-2015-herring-and-vsp-complete-audit-and-update-of-concealed-handgun-permit-recognition

Virginia’s Attorney General has completed an audit of 30 States and removed 25 of them from their reciprocity list. The VSP has accepted the changes which go into effect Feb 1, 2016.

Of interest is that Florida has been removed – which also means VA residents lose their ability to CCW in FL and must now get a FL non-resident license to continue to do so. My home state WA has also been removed.

Michigan, Oklahoma, Texas, Utah, and West Virginia will continue to be recognized.

 

Here is some commentary from the Washington Post that it is suspected to be a political move by the AG:
https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/virginia-politics/va-attorney-general-mark-herring-delivers-blow-to-gun-rights-advocates/2015/12/21/d72ce3d0-a821-11e5-9b92-dea7cd4b1a4d_story.html

CA State Lt Gov preparing initiative on BAN on “tactical” firearms and magazines & Federal HR4269

Despite the fact that recent polls show that support for an “assault weapons” ban is at an all-time low

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/assault-weapons-ban-poll_56715c23e4b0dfd4bcbff62e
http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/now-oppose-assault-weapons-ban-doubts-stopping-lone/story?id=35778846

the anti-gun supporters have been pushing new bans on what they either don’t understand (or don’t care). We know that in the end that the target is ALL semi-autos. The anti-gunners are not shy about listing Australia as one of their models.

Here’s is what is going on —

HR4269 was filed in the U.S. House:
https://www.congress.gov/bill/114th-congress/house-bill/4269/titles
Details are sketchy since there is no summary or text of the bill yet, but rumors say that it is targets any semi-auto that can take a >10rd mag and has one “tactical” feature.
No word if wearing cargo pants counts as a tactical feature.

More frighteningly the California Lt. Governor is finishing up work on a State-wide initiative that does even worse – a total outright ban without any grand fathering. No due process? How progressive.
http://www.seattletimes.com/opinion/editorials/its-time-to-ban-assault-style-weapons-high-capacity-magazines/

 

I can only think of all the people who have been calling gun owners “paranoid” and saying that “nobody wants to take your guns away.”
Yeah, right.

 

Taurus PT-22 Poly vs Beretta 21a Bobcat

My Dad recently confronted a burglar and wanted some very small and lightweight. He preferred a semi-auto, but it needed to be able to fit into a robe pocket. Since he is older I worried about his ability to be able to rack a semi-auto slide under stress or late at night. The first pistol I thought of was the Beretta 21a Bobcat because of the tilt barrel making loading/unloading simple. But, I couldn’t find one (he can’t have mine). He actually wanted a 25ACP. I personally prefer the 22LR but I thought the straight wall cartridge might feed better, especially if the pistol isn’t kept clean and well lubricated–something I find that the Bobcat requires. The Bobcat does not like to be run dry.

What I did find him is a Taurus PT-22 Poly. He is already a Taurus fan and a has a Taurus 85. Additionally he likes “features” like the internal lock and safety (on a DAO?) I have to remember it is not for me.

Here are some pics with my notes comparing it to my Bobcat.

  • I was genuinely surprised at the PT-22 grip. It is much larger than the Bobcat. The magazine also has an extended base plate that is wide and long
  • The PT-22 is a DAO pistol
  • The PT-22 has a magazine disconnect safety that also locks the slide
  • Both pistols have a locking safety. The Bobcat can be locked cocked and locked or with hammer-down DA
  • Disassembly is the same but note that the magazine must be in the PT-22 to move the slide
  • The PT-22 is supposed to be .8 ounces lighter than the Bobcat – they feel the same.

 

Click on pic to enlarge

 

The PT-22 in the box.
image1

 

Comparison pic PT-22 (L) vs Bobcat (R)
image2

 

Bobcat on top – pretty close in size overall
image3

 

You can see how much wider the base plate is on the PT-22.
image4

 

PT-22 baseplate lets you get an extra finger on the grip
image5

 

PT-22’s feed ramp (right) is much more extended
The tilt barrel is cool – makes it easy to load/unload and requires no hand strength to function the slide
image6

 

Bobcat vs PT-22 magazine. Size difference is immediately apparent
image7

 

PT-22 front sight is taller
image8

 

PT-22 rear sight groove is also larger. Note that the PT-22 has a bobbed hammer
image9

 

Note the triggers are cut differently especially the bottom hook on the PT-22 (top). The material and thickness seem the same.
How do they compare? It is probably not fair since my Bobcat is 10-20 years old and very well broken in – it is smooth as butter in SA or DA.
The Taurus is of course safety heavy. It snaps clean though (remember to use an empty case or risk breaking the firing pin!)
image10

 

For some reason the pistol comes with a bag as does the internal lock.
I am not a fan but my Dad likes them.
image11

 

I included this from the manual because they have some very strong feelings on +P and +P+ ammo.
To be fair the manual also does talk about using the safety if you “must” carry it loaded whereas a lot of other manufacturers just say not to.
image12

 

 

High Noon Undertaker Shoulder Holster Review

I have been wanting to get a new shoulder rig for driving. I currently have a couple, but they are for full-size all-steel pistols and I think that something a little more weight would be more comfortable. I have also been wanting to get another holster for my FNX. I only have the stock (BladeTech) OWB currently.

So, when I saw a close out sale from High Noon with an Undertaker for $70 I jumped at it. Actually, they had Glock 19/23 Under Armor too but I didn’t call fast enough the next day. I would have bought that too :) The difference between the two holsters is all leather with hard molded holster vs a synthetic leather like material which is unmolded. I have an Under Armor holster for my S&W ™* 1066. It is very leather-like and nice.

*I am not affiliated with the company known as “Smith & Wesson” in any way. It’s trademarks are held by whoever they are held by.

Anyway, the Underarmor was a left hand, but they were able to flip the holster portion inside out to make it a right hand. The only difference is that traditionally the smooth side of the leather faces out, while the rough is on inside. In this case it is flipped. This is strictly cosmetic and makes no difference functionally.

I have to say that I am VERY impressed! The holster is very simple in design and quite frankly very well put together. I have only tried a handful of shoulder rigs, with the Galco Miami Classic II being my favorite – at least up until now. The High Noon Under Taker is by far the most comfortable I have worn yet.

I like to wear my holster and mag carrier to ride fairly high up. Galco seems to think that it should ride much lower than I would like and I run out of adjustment. Maybe I am shorter than the average shoulder rig wearer (I am 5’7″).

Some observations follow:

High Noon leather quality is very nice, in fact nicer than some other holsters I own. I don’t know if it makes any difference but Galco feels like it is sealed or laminated. The High Noon does not and that makes it feel less stiff. Maybe that is why it is more comfortable?

-The High Noon comes with very simple hardware–I like that. The only bulk is from the leather itself.

-The High Noon comes with keepers. VERY VERY nice touch! Since I like the holster/mag carrier to ride up high, there is a lot of extra material.

-The High Noon comes with a lot of notches for adjustment. One pair almost goes up to the top. I found putting that side in the back worked best for me.

-The High Noon’s straps are all the same size. Depending on the Galco rig you get this may or may not be true (MC’s are the same while the SSII has larger front straps).

-The High Noon mag carrier is drop down. This is similar to the Miami Classic. The Maimi Classic II holds the mags horizontally. I really like (and have gotten use to) this. The horizontal mags are very fast to access. However, the drop down are very secure with the flap. Dual snaps also allow multiple magazine sizes – I tried Glock 23 mags without any problem. Note: Both the MC and MCII can also accomodate mutiple sizes.

Driving with the High Noon was great. Success!
And now some pics. I apologize for the pic quality, my light box accidentally got destroyed in my garage and I have to make a new one. Camera is is my Nokia Lumia cell phone — I am lazy tonight.

Click on any pic to view the full-size.

Cocked & locked! High Noon gears their holster for hammer down but it works fine.
WP_20130924_001

WP_20130924_002

Simple hardware works great. They do pivot.
WP_20130924_003

Straps pivot on the center diamond. Note the keepers – there are four, although only two are visible in the pic.
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Mag crrier
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Mag carrier
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“Selfie” (haha) just to show how I like to position the holster and mag carrier
WP_20130924_008 (2)

Just ordered a CMP Garand

Well, I just submitted my paperwork for another M1 Garand (it will be my second). It should only be a short 6 month wait! Wow, and I thought 2 months was a long wait last time! How times change.

For those not familiar CMP = Civilian Marksmanship Program they have some great benefits & programs! One of their most popular benefits is the purchase of a former issue M1 Garand rifle! Meeting the program requirements is not very hard and you can own a piece of history. If you have any interest I would purchase in the near future, you never know what will happen, or how long supply will last.

Anyway, just wanted to share :)

Here is my Springfield and my Inland M1 Carbine, both from the CMP (Carbines are long gone I am afraid – I wish I got two)…

Multnomah County Sheriff suspends concealed weapons permits to out-of-state (WA) residents

Source: opb.org

“So the sheriff made the decision to go ahead and focus on Multnomah County resident applications, try and reduce that backlog, and then we’ll re-open the process for Washington State residents who have business here in Oregon.”

Oregon is a little different than most states in that while resident CCW licenses are required by law (shall issue) if the person meets the requirements, non-resident CCW licenses (contiguous states only) are completely discretionary (may issue). This means that the it can (and does) vary from county to county. I know of at least one county that simply does not issue to non-Oregon residents.

It would appear that the Multnomah County is currently inundated by applications. We can assume that since they get a lot of WA applications because of Portland. They state that they will reopen the applications at least from WA in the future. What about the other states, I wonder?

Is it coincidental to the fact that Multinomah County just passed some interesting new firearm restrictions? New restrictions include the open carrying of a firearm while hiking and making it illegal to have a loaded magazine in “public” even if you don’t have a firearm! See source: Oregonian

I guess we will find out what happens in the future.

Glock Gen4 goodness (with pic) and good news – Blue Labels shipping now!

My local gunshop called to let me know that my Glock 23 and 27 Gen4s had come in! They said that Glock was definitely shipping now and that they had received more Glocks in the last two weeks than they have all year. Blue Labels, even for law enforcement were running almost two months. My pistols took 2 1/2 months.

Initial impressions?
Build quality is very good. Finish looks like it has changed again. It is more dull and a little greyer. It looks like it will scratch easier than previous iterations, but it is too early to tell. Frame is still stamped made in Austria – folks had been telling me that the all U.S. made models had replaced the Austrian made ones. While the U.S. made models do exist, it appears that they are not in U.S. distribution yet (at least for the models I bought).

The trigger?
It also seems that Glock has been doing some work here. The original Gen4 triggers felt gritty, heavy and stiff (IMO), at least when compared with Gen3s. This pair have great triggers. It is clean with a crisp break. In fact, I think that the reset it better than the Gen3. The break itself seems to have less of the “sproing” found in Gen3s.

The feel?
I really like the “cuboid” grip texture. The small grip of the 23 fits my hand even better than the Gen3. The 27 small grip may be a bit too small. Range time will tell. I didn’t like the mag release in pics but it does feel pretty good. I found nothing wrong with the Gen3 release so I would have preferred that they didn’t change it.

That’s all I can think of at the moment. I am glad to have some Gen4 to gain some experience on. Even the Glock Armorers Course was very light on them. I will report back when I get some range time on them. Unfortunately, I didn’t expect both to come in at the same time, so I ran out of $ to buy ammmo :)

Eventually these will replace my other non-Glock brand polymer pistols as my daily CCW.

Obligatory camera phone pic below (click pic to enlarge):

gen4

After being defeated City of Seattle begins its anti-gun state initiatives

After being humiliated in court SEVERAL times, and being unable to successfully lobby the Legislature it continues its anti-gun crusade by attempting citizen initiatives. This first one is about “universal” un-enforceable background checks but I know that City lawyers have been drafting one to repeal state firearms pre-emption – this is a sore spot for the City since its illegal banning of firearms in parks was (correctly) nullified by the Courts.

We have known this was coming as City officials have been alluding to it since their defeat.

As I have pointed out, previously, the universal background checks legislation is so poorly written that the requirement could have been simply bypassed by a person by saying that they:
1. didn’t own the firearm
2. got the firearm prior to the law

Is that the kind of feel good law we want in our State? Completely unenforceable? WASTE OF TIME!

Also, noteworthy, is that WA State Citizen Initiative cannot be modified by the Legislature for *2* years. We cannot allow this to pass. Please spread the word!

LINK to article

TEXT OF ARTICLE:

OLYMPIA, Wash. (AP) — After struggling to sway both state and federal lawmakers, proponents of expanding background checks for gun sales are now exploring whether they will have more success by taking the issue directly to voters.

While advocates generally prefer that new gun laws be passed through the legislative process, especially at the national level, they are also concerned about how much sway the National Rifle Association has with lawmakers. Washington Rep. Jamie Pedersen, a Democrat who had sponsored unsuccessful legislation on background checks at the state level, said a winning ballot initiative would make a statement with broad implications.

“It’s more powerful if the voters do it — as opposed to our doing it,” Pedersen said. “And it would make it easier for the Legislature to do even more.”

On Monday, proponents of universal background checks in Washington will announce their plan to launch a statewide initiative campaign that would require the collection of some 300,000 signatures, according to a person involved in the initiative planning who spoke on condition of anonymity so as not to pre-empt the official announcement. The advocates have scheduled a fundraiser in Seattle at the end of next month and hope to have a campaign budget in the millions of dollars.

Ballot measures may be an option elsewhere, too. Hildy Saizow, president of Arizonans for Gun Safety, said an initiative is one of the things the group will be considering as it reconsiders strategies. An organizer in Oregon was focused on the Legislature for now but wouldn’t rule out a ballot measure in the future if lawmakers fail to pass a proposed bill there.

While advocates have had success on background checks in places like Connecticut and Colorado, they’ve been thwarted in some other states and in Congress. The U.S. Senate rejected a plan to expand background checks earlier this month, although lawmakers in the chamber are still working to gather additional votes.

Brian Malte, director of mobilization at the national nonprofit lobbying group Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence, said passage through Congress is the ideal in order to have a national solution and so that states with strong gun laws aren’t undermined by nearby states with weaker standards. He noted that initiative campaigns are costly endeavors that can drain important, limited resources.

Still, Malte said, the ballot measures are an option to consider.

“At some point, certainly decisions need to be made about what the right time is to say we take it to the people,” Malte said.

Brian Judy, a lobbyist who represents the NRA in Washington state, did not return calls seeking comment about the new initiative. He has previously said the NRA would likely oppose such an effort, arguing that the recently proposed laws on background checks would largely impact law-abiding citizens instead of the intended targets such as criminals and the mentally ill.

Gun measures have had mixed results at the ballot. More than 70 percent of Washington state voters rejected a 1997 initiative campaign that would have required handgun owners to pass a safety course. After the Columbine High School massacre in 1999, voters in Colorado and Oregon approved ballot measures the next year to require background checks for buying weapons at gun shows.

Following another massacre in Colorado earlier this year, state lawmakers approved a bill to expand background checks to private transactions and online purchases. A similar expansion plan in Oregon is stalled in the state Senate.

Some states don’t see initiatives as a viable option right now. In Missouri, state Rep. Stacey Newman has been pushing for background checks with little success. While she spoke positively about the idea of a ballot initiative, she said there’s no serious consideration of it because of the cost and coordination required just to get it on the ballot. Instead, the supporters of background checks in the state are simply working to prevent NRA-supported legislation from passing the state’s General Assembly.

“We’re continually on defense,” she said.

Gun buyers currently must undergo a background check when they purchase a weapon from a federally licensed firearms dealer but can avoid checks through private purchases or at some gun shows.

Washington state advocates believe polls show the public is sufficiently on the side of expanding background checks further. An independent Elway Poll conducted two months ago found that 79 percent of registered voters in Washington state supported background checks on all gun sales, including private transactions.

That wasn’t enough to shepherd the bill through the Legislature. Even in the state House, which is controlled by Democrats, supporters fell short after an NRA campaign put pressure on some lawmakers. Pedersen had offered concessions through the process, including the option of sending the measure out for a public vote and exemptions for people who already have concealed pistol licenses or law enforcement credentials.

Pedersen said he was working with the initiative organizers on language for the proposal, and he said the Legislature would first have another chance to adopt the measure early next year. If it fails among lawmakers again, the proposal would then automatically go to the ballot, where Pedersen said he welcomed a campaign competing against groups like the NRA.

“I’m not afraid of it at all,” Pedersen said. “The public is really with us. It’s the right policy. I think it can be useful for further progress.”

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