Category name:Beretta

Taurus PT-22 Poly vs Beretta 21a Bobcat

My Dad recently confronted a burglar and wanted some very small and lightweight. He preferred a semi-auto, but it needed to be able to fit into a robe pocket. Since he is older I worried about his ability to be able to rack a semi-auto slide under stress or late at night. The first pistol I thought of was the Beretta 21a Bobcat because of the tilt barrel making loading/unloading simple. But, I couldn’t find one (he can’t have mine). He actually wanted a 25ACP. I personally prefer the 22LR but I thought the straight wall cartridge might feed better, especially if the pistol isn’t kept clean and well lubricated–something I find that the Bobcat requires. The Bobcat does not like to be run dry.

What I did find him is a Taurus PT-22 Poly. He is already a Taurus fan and a has a Taurus 85. Additionally he likes “features” like the internal lock and safety (on a DAO?) I have to remember it is not for me.

Here are some pics with my notes comparing it to my Bobcat.

  • I was genuinely surprised at the PT-22 grip. It is much larger than the Bobcat. The magazine also has an extended base plate that is wide and long
  • The PT-22 is a DAO pistol
  • The PT-22 has a magazine disconnect safety that also locks the slide
  • Both pistols have a locking safety. The Bobcat can be locked cocked and locked or with hammer-down DA
  • Disassembly is the same but note that the magazine must be in the PT-22 to move the slide
  • The PT-22 is supposed to be .8 ounces lighter than the Bobcat – they feel the same.

 

Click on pic to enlarge

 

The PT-22 in the box.
image1

 

Comparison pic PT-22 (L) vs Bobcat (R)
image2

 

Bobcat on top – pretty close in size overall
image3

 

You can see how much wider the base plate is on the PT-22.
image4

 

PT-22 baseplate lets you get an extra finger on the grip
image5

 

PT-22’s feed ramp (right) is much more extended
The tilt barrel is cool – makes it easy to load/unload and requires no hand strength to function the slide
image6

 

Bobcat vs PT-22 magazine. Size difference is immediately apparent
image7

 

PT-22 front sight is taller
image8

 

PT-22 rear sight groove is also larger. Note that the PT-22 has a bobbed hammer
image9

 

Note the triggers are cut differently especially the bottom hook on the PT-22 (top). The material and thickness seem the same.
How do they compare? It is probably not fair since my Bobcat is 10-20 years old and very well broken in – it is smooth as butter in SA or DA.
The Taurus is of course safety heavy. It snaps clean though (remember to use an empty case or risk breaking the firing pin!)
image10

 

For some reason the pistol comes with a bag as does the internal lock.
I am not a fan but my Dad likes them.
image11

 

I included this from the manual because they have some very strong feelings on +P and +P+ ammo.
To be fair the manual also does talk about using the safety if you “must” carry it loaded whereas a lot of other manufacturers just say not to.
image12

 

 

Strange times – Gates dumps millions into anti-gun initiative while Apple hires a designer who designed a Beretta shotgun

There are indeed strange times.

Microsoft’s Bill Gates seems to now think that that he knows better than law enforcement unions/groups and sheriffs in WA and is dumping millions into anti-gun initiative 594. He is even at odds with Microsoft’s own gun club (yep, there is one).

http://www.komonews.com/news/local/Bill-Gates-wife-donate-1-million-to-gun-control-initiative-272615021.html
I am still waiting to hear what size soda he thinks I should be drinking/allowed to buy.
Maybe I would have if I hadn’t moved our family off of Windows Phone 8.1. Oh Cortana, what have your masters done!?

 

But on the flip-side, Apple just hired a designer that recently designed a beautiful SxS shotgun. That’s a side-by-side for whoever wrote the new “Purge” movie — it’s not “Es Ex Es.”

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/apple-designer-marc-newson-made-172315237.html

 

Wacky times.

 

 

 

Oct is time for another handgun! (rambling) Thoughts on the Beretta 92FS and other things…

Well, it is October and that means that I should buy another handgun. I know that should please Piers Anthony and Jim Carrey immensely. Oh well!

I was recently impressed with Beretta USA’s statement that they may move from restrictive Maryland. That ended up not coming to fruition, but they did state that any future expansion would be elsewhere. That is at least a start and is more than some other big East Coast gun companies. It is noteworthy to mention that Magpul & PTR have moved, Kahr & Ruger have moved some operations, and Colt has expanded in Florida.

But I digress. Why the Beretta 92FS/M9? This is prior to blogging but back in 1985-6 I was not a fan. I couldn’t believe that the venerable M1911A1 which had served for 75 years and was being replaced by a pistol with undesirable features (my list of cons at the time):

  • big
  • fat
  • 9mm
  • looong heavy double-action
  • slide mounted safety
  • integral front sight
  • open top design
  • complicated (# of parts) design
  • I wasn’t a big fan of the 9mm, but if I had to have a 9mm it should be a High Power. I still love the HP, but 9mm ammo has come a long away and a lot of my early criticisms are not a concern to me any longer.

    Well, almost 30 years later I have come to admire the pistol. One has to admit that despite the controversy and “problems” it has served the United States well. When I say problems I mean specifically the Italian metallurgy issues (that brought about the 92F to 92FS) and broken locking blocks. Both these issues appear to be very limited in scope. Compare to other folks recalls lately (hmm…that sounds like another blog post in itself).

    Other “issues” like the effectiveness of 9mm FMJ in combat or bad contract magazines can’t really be blamed on the pistol.

    What else changed my mind about the Beretta 92FS? Actually spending some range time with one! First time out with one I was able to qualify marksman with it. I was amazed at how straight shooting they are. The craftsmanship on this particular one was exemplary (it was a 90’s Italian if that makes any difference). The pistol operated liked butter – the trigger/hammer although ridiculously long and heavy were superb and everything about it was smooth without grittiness. Pull the action back on one, cock the hammer – no break in required!

    You may have noticed that I am not a big fan of the looong and heavy double-action trigger. At the time I was coming exclusively from the world of 1911s and HiPowers. I didn’t like any DA but the Beretta in particular was stood out as excessive. Since then I have a lot more shooting experience with DA pistols and well, have become more proficient with them.

    Ironically, DA-pistols once claimed the pistol thrown and were all the rage, are now out of vogue. In fact, try and find one. There are few made in the world of single-actions and strikers. Take a look at Ruger’s offering. Ruger pistols were once dominated with double-action pistols in just about any caliber. Now there are none. The P95 (under-rated IMO) was on there the last time I looked, but must have been recently removed.

    My, how times have changed. When the U.S. Military announced M9 adoption everyone rushed out to buy one – at inflated prices. Now, I called around to find one and the youngster who answered the phone at one shop didn’t even know what one was! Forced to looked it up he said that they were discontinued and that all I could get was a compact, INOX (which he had no idea meant stainless slide with silver frame), and M9A1. The 92FS is still in the Beretta catalog, so I hope that they are made. I was bummed that I did not see the Brigadier offered any longer. I don’t think the slide beefing up is needed any longer, but I don’t see it as a detriment.

    The Beretta 92 was designed in 1972 so it is not that old of a design, at least when compared to the 1911 or the HiPower (adopted in 1911 by the U.S. and 1935 by Belgium respectively). I pick these two pistols because they are were designed by John Browning and influenced almost all small arms pistols that have come since. If it has a tilt barrel, it is based on Browning’s designs. Did you know that one of the HiPowr prototypes was a striker pistol? The Beretta 92FS however is completely different and to me that makes it stand out.

    So, what about that list of negatives? Well, they are still there but keep in mind that it is a duty pistol. For me, it will be a range and a nightstand bump in the night pistol and will be perfect. I also suspect that its smooth functioning and non-existent recoil will make it a hit for training new shooters. I still wouldn’t considered it as a primary CCW pistol.

    Sometimes, things are worth taking a second look.

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