Category name:CCW

I don’t care what study says otherwise, women can defend themselves

Original article: Gun ownership does not make women safer from the Boston Globe

This is an example of showing that a study will prove exactly what you set out to prove.

First they attack the statement that a woman with a firearm can defend herself. In fact, they even go as far as to say that they have discredited its possibility by citing a particular study.

However, the study doesn’t have anything to do with women owning a firearm!
Instead the study actually says that women, who are around more people with firearms are more likely to get harmed by a firearm. hmm…no  mention of the rates of firearm ownership by women though.

Is that like the study that concluded that if you own a firearm, that you are more likely to get shot with your own firearm?

“The presence of a gun is the biggest risk factor for domestic violence deaths among women.”
Really? The “biggest” risk factor? So, if a woman knows someone with multiple firearms (gasp!) is she exponentially more in danger? Right. It’s the gun(s), not the person – got it.

The article also strikes me as sexist in its implications that a woman cannot handle a firearm. In me experience, that is simply not true.

Bloomberg group attacks VA Governor for daring to…compromise?

Source: https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/virginia-politics/bloomberg-gun-control-group-launches-new-ad-against-mcauliffe/2016/02/09/5ef0e3e6-cf16-11e5-b2bc-988409ee911b_story.html

Anti-gun groups are quick to say that pro-gun people are unreasonable and unwilling to compromise.
But apparently, they are quick to attack any pro-gun control supporter who might be willing to make a compromise. Hypocritical much?

Their complaints are very weak. Each side got something, and to use the anti-gunners’ mantra:
“If it saves just one life!”

They wanted people with protective orders against them to not be able to give/sell their firearms away, but rather be required to give them to law enforcement. Why?

And the universal background checks requirement for gun shows is voluntary with a stationed police officer at gun shows didn’t go far enough. But “if it saves just one life”? Right?

It essentially restores status quo of CCW reciprocity that existed before the AG’s “re-examination” and to quote the article: “…in exchange for tighter restrictions on gun ownership by domestic abusers and voluntary background checks at gun shows.”

Sounds good, right? Apparently not! I guess unless it is completely draconian or has the word “ban” in it, it is no good.

Let’s also not forget the fact that there were a couple of bills introduced that would have reversed the CCW reciprocity AG ruling anyway. One attempted to make VA a CCW license-less state which would honor any state’s CCW license!

In the end (and being from the Commonwealth myself) I like Gov. McAuliffe’s response:

McAuliffe dismissed the criticism during an appearance in Northern Virginia, saying “everybody supports [the gun deal] except one gun-safety group out of New York City.”

VA Gov & Republicans reach compromise on firearm reciprocity

Well, this is an interesting twist. I am kind of impressed that a bipartisan agreement was reached in the Commonwealth of Virginia, however, I am alarmed that the Governor’s Office (and Attorney General) have the ability to enforce/interpret the law.

Regardless, it looks like states will be added back in. I know that there are also several bills being floated that would make Virginia a permit-less state and one that would require them to honor any other state’s CCW license.

 

Article:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/virginia-politics/mcauliffe-to-restore-handgun-reciprocity-in-deal-with-republicans/2016/01/28/6f8c0240-c5d8-11e5-9693-933a4d31bcc8_story.html?postshare=6951454005619197&tid=ss_tw

 

Original article that VA was removing 25 states from their reciprocity list:

http://firearms.fortreg.com/?p=4781

 

Virginia removes 25 States from CCW Reciprocity including WA and FL (Note: UT is still valid)

Source: http://www.oag.state.va.us/index.php/media-center/news-releases/675-december-22-2015-herring-and-vsp-complete-audit-and-update-of-concealed-handgun-permit-recognition

Virginia’s Attorney General has completed an audit of 30 States and removed 25 of them from their reciprocity list. The VSP has accepted the changes which go into effect Feb 1, 2016.

Of interest is that Florida has been removed – which also means VA residents lose their ability to CCW in FL and must now get a FL non-resident license to continue to do so. My home state WA has also been removed.

Michigan, Oklahoma, Texas, Utah, and West Virginia will continue to be recognized.

 

Here is some commentary from the Washington Post that it is suspected to be a political move by the AG:
https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/virginia-politics/va-attorney-general-mark-herring-delivers-blow-to-gun-rights-advocates/2015/12/21/d72ce3d0-a821-11e5-9b92-dea7cd4b1a4d_story.html

CA State Lt Gov preparing initiative on BAN on “tactical” firearms and magazines & Federal HR4269

Despite the fact that recent polls show that support for an “assault weapons” ban is at an all-time low

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/assault-weapons-ban-poll_56715c23e4b0dfd4bcbff62e
http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/now-oppose-assault-weapons-ban-doubts-stopping-lone/story?id=35778846

the anti-gun supporters have been pushing new bans on what they either don’t understand (or don’t care). We know that in the end that the target is ALL semi-autos. The anti-gunners are not shy about listing Australia as one of their models.

Here’s is what is going on —

HR4269 was filed in the U.S. House:
https://www.congress.gov/bill/114th-congress/house-bill/4269/titles
Details are sketchy since there is no summary or text of the bill yet, but rumors say that it is targets any semi-auto that can take a >10rd mag and has one “tactical” feature.
No word if wearing cargo pants counts as a tactical feature.

More frighteningly the California Lt. Governor is finishing up work on a State-wide initiative that does even worse – a total outright ban without any grand fathering. No due process? How progressive.
http://www.seattletimes.com/opinion/editorials/its-time-to-ban-assault-style-weapons-high-capacity-magazines/

 

I can only think of all the people who have been calling gun owners “paranoid” and saying that “nobody wants to take your guns away.”
Yeah, right.

 

“The Australia Gun Control Fallacy” (linked article)

This article was very good about Australia and how they were able to confiscate guns and how something similar might look in the United States. The Australia “model” is popularly referenced by many folks as a result of recent shootings including the President.

I don’t link many articles requiring the reader to click but this one is worth reading from the source:
http://thefederalist.com/2015/06/25/the-australia-gun-control-fallacy/

 

 

Taurus PT-22 Poly vs Beretta 21a Bobcat

My Dad recently confronted a burglar and wanted some very small and lightweight. He preferred a semi-auto, but it needed to be able to fit into a robe pocket. Since he is older I worried about his ability to be able to rack a semi-auto slide under stress or late at night. The first pistol I thought of was the Beretta 21a Bobcat because of the tilt barrel making loading/unloading simple. But, I couldn’t find one (he can’t have mine). He actually wanted a 25ACP. I personally prefer the 22LR but I thought the straight wall cartridge might feed better, especially if the pistol isn’t kept clean and well lubricated–something I find that the Bobcat requires. The Bobcat does not like to be run dry.

What I did find him is a Taurus PT-22 Poly. He is already a Taurus fan and a has a Taurus 85. Additionally he likes “features” like the internal lock and safety (on a DAO?) I have to remember it is not for me.

Here are some pics with my notes comparing it to my Bobcat.

  • I was genuinely surprised at the PT-22 grip. It is much larger than the Bobcat. The magazine also has an extended base plate that is wide and long
  • The PT-22 is a DAO pistol
  • The PT-22 has a magazine disconnect safety that also locks the slide
  • Both pistols have a locking safety. The Bobcat can be locked cocked and locked or with hammer-down DA
  • Disassembly is the same but note that the magazine must be in the PT-22 to move the slide
  • The PT-22 is supposed to be .8 ounces lighter than the Bobcat – they feel the same.

 

Click on pic to enlarge

 

The PT-22 in the box.
image1

 

Comparison pic PT-22 (L) vs Bobcat (R)
image2

 

Bobcat on top – pretty close in size overall
image3

 

You can see how much wider the base plate is on the PT-22.
image4

 

PT-22 baseplate lets you get an extra finger on the grip
image5

 

PT-22’s feed ramp (right) is much more extended
The tilt barrel is cool – makes it easy to load/unload and requires no hand strength to function the slide
image6

 

Bobcat vs PT-22 magazine. Size difference is immediately apparent
image7

 

PT-22 front sight is taller
image8

 

PT-22 rear sight groove is also larger. Note that the PT-22 has a bobbed hammer
image9

 

Note the triggers are cut differently especially the bottom hook on the PT-22 (top). The material and thickness seem the same.
How do they compare? It is probably not fair since my Bobcat is 10-20 years old and very well broken in – it is smooth as butter in SA or DA.
The Taurus is of course safety heavy. It snaps clean though (remember to use an empty case or risk breaking the firing pin!)
image10

 

For some reason the pistol comes with a bag as does the internal lock.
I am not a fan but my Dad likes them.
image11

 

I included this from the manual because they have some very strong feelings on +P and +P+ ammo.
To be fair the manual also does talk about using the safety if you “must” carry it loaded whereas a lot of other manufacturers just say not to.
image12

 

 

Portable Lockboxes: Gun Vault NV300 vs Hornady TriPoint

I am sure that we all have encountered that place where we cannot legally bring a firearm. I am sometimes forced to leave it in my vehicle or hotel room, etc.  As a result I have been using a Gun Vault NV300 for about a year primarily leaving it in my vehicle, sometimes dragging it into a hotel room or even at home (when leaving a loaded firearm on the night stand may not be a good idea).

I have been happy with it, but decided to purchase a second lock box for the home so I can leave it there to use whenever I need it. I also had the idea that a 3-digit combination in the car was not a good idea since I can be gone from the car for hours – If you have the time, there are only 1000 possible combinations to go through. The box itself is also very small and light, so I thought maybe a bigger/heavier one might be better and hoped for a beefier lock mechanism.

I purchased the Hornady TriPoint for these reasons. They were both in the $30 range and use a similar setup: locking box padded with foam and both have a cable lock attachment (a hole drilled through the side) that you can loop it onto something stable to keep it secure. Basically it works like a bicycle cable lock.

The Hornady is definitely larger and heavier. This actually was a detriment in my case. It was noticeably harder to hide as the Gun Vault was able to slip under my front seat and be easily covered with the floor mat. The Hornady was very noticeable. I am going to try getting an additional floor mat and make it look like a part of the car (just another unexplained hump?). The big advantage to the Hornady for me are the three locking points vs the single latch of the Gun Vault (see pics below). Another plus to me is that it uses a barrel lock key. I think the pics will explain better than I can write.

Click on any pic for full-size

Here you can see the physical size difference and 3-digit combo vs barrel lock:

image1

 

Here they are both opened up:

image2

Another pic for size comparison:

Here is the Hornady 3-point latch system (aka “TriPoint” ):

image3

 

Single latch of the Gun Vault NV300:

image4

 

Hornady’s 3-points locking points in the frame:

image6

 

Closeup of one of the Hornady’s locking points:

image5

 

Here is a closeup of the Gun Vaults locking point. Not sure why there are 2 notches since it only has a single latch:

image7

 

Here are both the units open. Notice that they hinge open on opposite sides (Gun Vault top, Hornady bottom):

image10

 

Closeup of the Hornady cable. Notice that the side that actually goes in the lock box has a spacer:

image11

 

Close up of the Gun Vault. The diameter of the 2 cables is about the same although the Gun Vault might be a little thicker. Notice that the loop-through loop is noticeably has a larger opening. This makes it much easier to attach it to things:

 

image13

 

For fun here is a pic of the underside of my Jeep Grand Cherokee (WK) seat where I looped the cable through a bar:

image14

Here is an alternate Jeep Grand Cherokee (WK) mounting point. Underneath the passenger seat. I then stretched the cable forward and placed the box under the driver’s seat. Makes it easy to access from the rear passenger seat.

image15

 

At home or hotels I attach it to anything that I can. I usually attach it to the bed frame. They can take the box but they will have to take the bed frame with them. I am going to see if I can hide the Hornady, I feel safer with it since it (appears) to be more pry resistant. If I can’t however, I will just switch it out for the Gun Vault and keep the Hornady at home.

However, either of these boxes is a worthy investment at about $30. As always, safety first!

Stories of the Death of 40S&W are Greatly Exaggerated

40 ounces – wait – what?

To be honest, when the 40S&W came out in in 1990 I was under-whelmed. I felt that the flexibility of the 10mm was close to ideal and that the 40S&W would never catch on. I actually was a fan of Evan Whildin’s of Action Arms Limited (think Uzi) 41 Action Express. Ironically, the 41AE was designed to replicate the 41 Magnum which itself was designed as the “ideal” law enforcement cartridge (according to Bill Jordan et al)

But I was sure wrong about the 40S&W! At the time it seemed to fill in the middle-ground and resolve the great caliber debate: 9mm vs 45ACP, fast vs slow, single-stack vs double-stack mags, light vs heavy. It caught on quickly and like a wild fire among law enforcement and quickly became the dominant round. I can’t help but think that the fact that we were under the 1994 high capacity magazine ban limiting capacity helped fuel its popularity – at least in the civilian market.

Despite this, it would take me about a decade of a proven track record to warm up to it. Let’s face it – the older I got, the heavier that full size 45 felt.

 

What was once old is new again!

Enter 2014 and the FBI has re-adopted the 9mm (more on that in a minute) and it seems that the internet is a buzz with stories of how the 40 is either dead or dying. More recently I have even seen a trend of where very well-known firearms experts seem to go out of their way to discredit the 40S&W. Not that I necessarily disagree with their reasons or evaluations (there is a pro and con to everything), but I find the sudden upswing of anti-endorsements odd.

Just yesterday I saw a thread where a prominent competition shooter said that he (still) preferred the 40 to the shock of many on the internet. There was a bit of criticism and I was surprised to see him defending his choice and even qualifying it. Gosh folks—he can shoot whatever he likes. I will never understand why anyone cares what someone else uses.

Speaking of what is old is new – consider the possibility of another assault weapons ban. It is a common mantra of anti-gunners’ “common sense” legislation. If we were limited to 10 rounds in new pistols again worse (all firearms) would your opinion change? Think that it couldn’t happen? Tell me how it couldn’t happen for the decade that it did. It is only because of the NRA that there was a 10 year sunset. If not for that clause we would STILL be under its limit (end political rant).

 

Internet declares the 40 S&W in its last days

But I digress, why do I think that the stories of the 40’s death are exaggerated?

The biggest reason is that it still holds about 60% of the U.S. Law enforcement market.

That is huge – it means that there are more 40 S&W pistols in service than ALL other calibers COMBINED!

Incidentally, the most popular law enforcement pistol is the Glock 22. Glock civilian sales are completely different and the best seller in the U.S. is the model 19.

 

But the FBI just switched to 9mm so the 40 will die out!

Will it? I was wrong about the switch-over to 40 S&W but this time I am not seeing the massive shift to follow the FBI like we have in the past. Yes, I know that there are some, but not like before.

Seems like the FBI switches standard issue very frequently. From memory I can think of four changes: revolver to 9mm, to 10mm, to 40S&W and now back to the 9mm. I think that most departments would have a hard time justifying the cost of changing calibers so frequently, let alone BACK to one previously used. Today’s political environment is also, unfortunately, much more hostile to law enforcement. I feel that there may be a public backlash to “buying the police new guns.” There would definitely be accusations of funding waste.

 

Abandoned FBI rounds just don’t die

I also question the belief that a round will die out because the FBI no longer uses it. Historically this simply is not true. None of the rounds that the FBI used formerly have died out! The 38, 357 Magnum, 9mm, 10mm, 40S&W are definitely still popular. For literally YEARS people have been saying that the 10mm was dead. At worst, it is a boutique round even though there were new pistols from Glock this year (who already has a pretty good line of 10’s), one from SIG (who has never made one previously) and an expanded line from RIA. Not too bad if you ask me. The 40S&W is even more established than the 10mm ever was.

 

Going down the same road as 41AE and 41Mag?

In fact, of all the rounds discussed I think that the only one that I would say is dead is the 41AE. It was never adopted by any agency and only available from a few providers – in a conversion kit, Tanfoglios and the IMI Jericho. I think ammo only came from UZI/Samson. If you think that the 40 S&W has a bit of kick or is hard on guns the 41AE was worse. I sold my Browning HiPower conversion kit long before it disappeared.

The 41 Magnum has fared a little better – It was adopted limitedly and revolvers are still made. Ammo is still available but far from common place. This is truthfully probably what a lot of people think of (hope?) for the future of the 40 S&W. But, the fact that a very powerful REVOLVER round (significantly more powerful than the 10mm) intended for law enforcement but only adopted by a few agencies (2 or 3?) still exists today is pretty remarkable. Besides Rick (Walking Dead) how many agencies even issue any revolver as a duty sidearm? Maybe some Corrections and Reserves? I think the 40 and 41 Mag comparison is not 1-to-1, but it is noteworthy.

 

Which is better: 9, 40, 45, 50AE? Google!

The 9mm vs 40S&W vs 45ACP vs whatever debates have been hashed to death on the internet. Way too much time and bandwidth is wasted on justifying what the “best” round is. I am not going to engage in each caliber’s pros/cons – and every cartridge has BOTH. Google’g will result in a ridiculous amount of material.

 

Some arguments are just not worth participating/Google first!

I do feel that I have to point out a weird caliber argument that I saw yesterday. Someone called the 40S&W “Short & Weak” when compared to the 9mm. Now, when the 40S&W was introduced there were people who called it “Short & Weak” in comparison to its big brother 10mm but using the phrase in a justification of the 9mm over 40S&W is just wacky – check your cartridge dimensions first! I wish I had kept the link to that particular thread. On second thought, I am glad I didn’t.

 

My conclusion? Somebody buy me a Wilson (in any caliber)

Carry what you want. They all work…mostly (well, they are all still just pistol rounds). As for the experts – they are not wrong and I respect their opinions (heck, I just bought a Glock 43 as a backup/deep conceal!). I am unsure of the seeming animosity towards the 40 S&W and why there feels like an anti-40 campaign. They are people too and are entitled to their opinion and to buy what they like.

But, like most police departments, I am heavily invested in 40 equipment and ammo. So, my main carry will continue to be 40S&W. Not that I don’t think that there are plenty of other reasons to stick with the 40 (it works and I like the boom), but economics alone are a big reason that the 40 S&W won’t be going away any time soon.


Some reading material if your bored/interested:

History of FBI hand guns – http://www.americanrifleman.org/articles/2011/8/22/a-history-of-fbi-handguns/

The Forgotten M&P (41Magnum) – http://modernserviceweapons.com/?p=3176

Wikipedia entry for 41AE – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/.41_Action_Express
(I wish I had kept some of the AAL promo material on it)

FBI Handgun Wounding Factor Effectiveness – http://gundata.org/images/fbi-handgun-ballistics.pdf
(I know it is a bit dated now, but it is worth reading)

Army opens up possibility of adopting non-9mm – http://kitup.military.com/2014/07/army-40-caliber-fbi-returns-9mm.html
(Not likely, but wouldn’t that be funny?)

 

What’s all this about Australia as a role model?

Wow, lots of people are taking about the great gun control they have in Australia in the wake of the Charleston shooting. Most noteably even the President mentioned it. Zero shootings since 1996 they claim. I know very little about AUS so I looked into the country briefly. I like to start with demographics. After all, to make such bold statements like we should adopt their gun control model we must be very similar, right?

Land mass:
Australia 2.97 million miles
U.S. 3.8 million miles

Population
Australia 23.13 million
U.S. 318.9 million (population of CA alone is 38 million)

Largest city
Sydney 4.3 million
NYC 8.4 million

Almost 50% of its ENTIRE population is within the largest 3 cities!
It jumps to 60% if you count the largest 5 cities.

The largest 5 cities in the U.S. combined make about 19 million people about 6% of the total population.

Keep in mind that the U.S. and Australia are very similar in physical size. Maybe not a 1-on-1 good comparison?

See something about the demographics that might make AUS a little different than the U.S.? By the way, all these numbers come from internet Google and Wikipedia.

And speaking of Wikipedia…so there is the assertion that gun crime/mass shootings stopped in 1996 after the Port Author Massacre.
According to Wikipedia that is not true. There are at least two: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_massacres_in_Australia

That’s as far as I have got so far. I stopped reading at the point that their constitution had “implied rights” and that voting was one.

Anyway, just some thoughts…

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